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A Little Help - Parents of Special Needs Kids

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December 11th, 2008


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ladynissa
07:57 am - A Little Help
Hello All.

For those that have been following me, you know a few things about what's going on with my son's school and I. So, today is the IEP meeting. I'm not sure I trust myself to be calm, cool, collected and say everything that needs to be said. I just got a note from his teacher, yesterday, saying that he is learning "beginning" counting and its going poorly because he doesn't understand numbers.

My jaw dropped and then I cried some.

I wrote her back telling her "1. He learned how to count a long time ago. 2. He knows numbers 3. his father, day care provider and I have done addition and subtraction with him. Try challenging my son and you might get results"

Anyway, I just need a little advice on how to come into this meeting and make it productive..without screaming, yelling and crying. Normally I do just fine, but I just don't trust myself this time.

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From:lemniskate
Date:December 11th, 2008 04:24 pm (UTC)
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Is there any way you could have someone go with you so that you feel like you have someone there with you who's completely on your side?

Another thing I would do - either way, whether you can bring backup, is to write down your concerns so you don't forget anything that you want to bring up.

and good luck. It is the hardest thing when you can't feel like your child's teacher and you are on the same side.
From:celticmoni
Date:December 12th, 2008 01:46 am (UTC)
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Try your best to check any negative emotions at the door. I know its tough, but its really the best way to keep the focus off of any adversarial feelings between yourself and the school system, and back on your kid and his needs.

Maybe bring in some worksheets that you've done with your son. Or, hey: In this high tech age, you may even be able to bring in a short video clip on your phone; one that shows you and your son doing math problems together. Before the meeting starts, it may be helpful to talk to the teacher and the program coordinator, and ask what other kinds of evidence of your son's abilities might be helpful, and offer to get those to these individuals before the meeting, so everyone has a chance to look them over and make plans and suggestions accordingly.

Best of Luck!

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